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Top 5 Marinades and How to Make a Good Steak

14 Feb

Steak, either you love it or you hate it.  You love it though, otherwise why would you be here?

Measurements should almost always be to individual tastes so I will not include them.  I never use recipes, I just put in what I think will work and it has never not worked, so I am putting 5 of those into writing for you.  Without further ado, well, you know the deal:

I suggest leaving your meat to soak in these for twenty-four hours if possible and leaving it out for one to two hours so that it is at room temperature when cooked.

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Marinade one:

This one would be nice to pair with veal, which should be considered a sub-genre of steak.

Rosemary

Dry White Wine

Basil

White Pepper

A small amount of white vinegar

Marinade Number Two:

Nice, basic and subtle.  Great for date night.

Dry Red Wine

Black Pepper

Basil

Oregano

Cayenne Pepper

Fresh garlic-Minced

Sliced Onions

Marinade Three:

Cajun Style.

Beer

Hickory Smoked Garlic Powder

Onion Powder

Cumin

Cinnamon

Cloves

Thyme

Black Pepper

White Pepper

Red Pepper

Paprika

Marinade Four:

All-American.

Whiskey (Do not, under any circumstances, use good whiskey for this.  It needn’t be cheap, but using a good single malt scotch to marinate meat is a crime against humanity)

Hickory smoked garlic powder

Mustard Powder

Cumin

Marinade Five:

Tequila (Go easy on this, too much will nastify your meat.  You may choose to exclude it completely.)

Lime Juice

Red Pepper

Paprika

Black Pepper

Garlic Powder

Part 2:

Creating a steak.

“Great steaks are not born, they are made.”

You will need:

A nonstick pan; preferably a cast iron skillet.

Oil.

A rill or an oven.

Granted certain cuts give you more to work with, but better to have a bad steak made right than a good cut ruined.

Now, let us go over the 10 commandments of meat.

1. Though shalt not base your recipes on, “what is cheapest and/or easiest.”

2. You will never fry steak. (The frying pan will be explained soon.)

3. Prepping is directly related to cooking but it is independent and either one does not necessitate the next.

4. As with all foods, but especially fish and meat, fresh is preferred over frozen.

5. Ketchup should be eliminated or at least minimised.

6. Remember the pnemonic “RAMSAC.”  Rinse and Marinate, Sear and Cook.

7. Try to avoid spice mixes, they are the easy way out.  The Mona Lisa was not paint-by-numbers.

8. White wine is absolutely, terrifically, completely, abhorrently innapropriate to consume with red meat.  In some social circles you are subject to capital punishment for violating this rule.

9. Never end a sentence with a preposition.

10. Meat can be good even if you don’t put much into it.

Now, on to the process.

Step One: Marinade and let sit until the meat is at room temperature, take care to occasionally turn the meat so that it is marinated on both sides.  Preheat oven to 275-350 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step Two: Heat your skillet and add not more than a table spoon of oil, you want in fact, as little as possible.  This step is not “frying,” it is “searing.”

When smoke starts to rise off of your pan and your oil is evenly distributed, put the steak in for no more than 15 seconds on the first side and then either flip or turn it for no more than 15 seconds on the next.

Step Three: If you cut onions, mushrooms, garlic or other supplementary items then put them in your skillet before the end of the second 15 seconds.  If you are using a cast iron pan, put it directly into the oven.  If you are using a frying pan, slide everything into a prewarmed baking dish.

Step Four: A true coinoisseur has discerning tastes.  The answer to, “How do you like your steak?” should never be, “Mmmmmmmmmeye dunno.”  When the steak is cooked to your liking, remove it from the oven.

Step five: Do not let it sit for more than 5 minutes, now is your chance to add garnishes, such as a bit of parsley, onto the dish and to pour some wine, scotch, or what have you.

Step Six: Stop reading.  Enjoy your steak.

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